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Women who do : female disciples in the Gospels / Holly J. Carey.

By: Material type: TextTextPublisher: Grand Rapids, Michigan : William B. Eerdmans Publishing Company, 2023Copyright date: ©2023Description: xi, 225 pages ; 23 cmContent type:
  • text
Media type:
  • unmediated
Carrier type:
  • volume
ISBN:
  • 9780802879158
  • 0802879152
Subject(s): DDC classification:
  • 270.1082 23/eng/20230901
LOC classification:
  • BR195.W6 C36 2023
Other classification:
  • REL006710 | REL114000
Contents:
Introduction: Female discipleship in the Gospels -- A woman's world in the first century -- Female discipleship in the Gospel of Mark -- Female discipleship in the Gospel of Matthew -- Female discipleship in the Gospel of Luke -- Female discipleship in the Acts of the Apostles -- Female discipleship in the Gospel of John -- Conclusion: Women in the Gospels as models of discipleship.
Summary: "A study of female discipleship in the gospels and Acts"-- Provided by publisher.Summary: "Meet the women who followed Jesus even when the Twelve failed. To be a disciple is to follow Jesus. And that requires action. But in the gospels, the disciples often falter. The Twelve even abandon Jesus at his crucifixion in many of the narratives. Yet it is female disciples who remain faithful to Jesus to the end. What do we make of this? In Women Who Do, Holly J. Carey examines what it means to be a disciple-and contends that it's the women who best embody discipleship in the gospels. Carey describes the expectations and social roles for women in first-century Greco-Roman and Jewish contexts. Then she offers a close reading of each of the four gospels, as well as Acts of the Apostles. What emerges is a cohesive narrative-critical case that the Twelve are not an equivalent group to the disciples. In fact, the Twelve are set as foils against the faithful, active, and often nameless disciples who populate the narratives-many of whom are women. Women Who Do is essential reading for students and scholars seeking a fuller understanding of women's roles in Jesus's ministry. Carey's argument not only clarifies the narrative of the gospels but also raises questions about how the church conceives of women's leadership today"-- Provided by publisher.
List(s) this item appears in: Added to Main Collection, Dec 2023 to Jan 2024 (sorted by Call Number)
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Book: Standard Hewitson Library, Presbyterian Research Centre Main BR195.W6 C37 2023 (Browse shelf(Opens below)) Available 24-061

Includes bibliographical references (pages 189-206) and indexes.

Introduction: Female discipleship in the Gospels -- A woman's world in the first century -- Female discipleship in the Gospel of Mark -- Female discipleship in the Gospel of Matthew -- Female discipleship in the Gospel of Luke -- Female discipleship in the Acts of the Apostles -- Female discipleship in the Gospel of John -- Conclusion: Women in the Gospels as models of discipleship.

"A study of female discipleship in the gospels and Acts"-- Provided by publisher.

"Meet the women who followed Jesus even when the Twelve failed. To be a disciple is to follow Jesus. And that requires action. But in the gospels, the disciples often falter. The Twelve even abandon Jesus at his crucifixion in many of the narratives. Yet it is female disciples who remain faithful to Jesus to the end. What do we make of this? In Women Who Do, Holly J. Carey examines what it means to be a disciple-and contends that it's the women who best embody discipleship in the gospels. Carey describes the expectations and social roles for women in first-century Greco-Roman and Jewish contexts. Then she offers a close reading of each of the four gospels, as well as Acts of the Apostles. What emerges is a cohesive narrative-critical case that the Twelve are not an equivalent group to the disciples. In fact, the Twelve are set as foils against the faithful, active, and often nameless disciples who populate the narratives-many of whom are women. Women Who Do is essential reading for students and scholars seeking a fuller understanding of women's roles in Jesus's ministry. Carey's argument not only clarifies the narrative of the gospels but also raises questions about how the church conceives of women's leadership today"-- Provided by publisher.

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