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Flood and fury : Old Testament violence and the Shalom of God / Matthew J. Lynch ; foreword by Helen Paynter.

By: Contributor(s): Material type: TextTextPublisher: Downers Grove, Illinois : IVP Academic, an imprint of InterVarsity Press, [2023]Description: xvi, 237 pages : illustrations, maps ; 23 cmContent type:
  • text
Media type:
  • unmediated
Carrier type:
  • volume
ISBN:
  • 9781514004296
  • 1514004291
Other title:
  • Old Testament violence and the Shalom of God
Subject(s): DDC classification:
  • 221.6 23/eng/20221123
LOC classification:
  • BS680.V55 L955 2023
Contents:
Part one: Real problem (with options) -- Facing the problem (without burning down your house) -- Finding our way -- Part two: Shalom and its shattering -- Shalom in creation's DNA -- Violence against women in the Bible's prologue -- Creation's collapse -- Shalom redux -- Part three: Reading Joshua with Yeshua -- Wielding the sword -- Negotiating with the enemy -- Minority report -- Show them no mercy -- Completing the Exodus in Canaan -- Giants will fall -- Worship as warfare -- Part four: Old Testament and the character of God -- What the Old Testament says about God's character -- Irresolvable.
Summary: What do we do with a God who sanctions violence? Old Testament violence proves one of the most troubling topics in the Bible. Too often, the explanations for the brutality in Scripture fail to adequately illustrate why God would sanction such horrors on humanity. These unanswered questions leave readers frustrated and confused, leading some to even walk away from their faith. In Flood and Fury, Old Testament scholar Matthew Lynch approaches two of the most violent passages in the Old Testament – the Flood and the Canaanite conquest – and offers a way forward that doesn't require softening or ignoring the most troubling aspects of these stories. While acknowledging the persistent challenge of violence in Scripture, Flood and Fury contends that reading with the grain of the text yields surprising insights into the goodness and the mercy of God. Through his exploration of themes related to violence including misogyny, racism, and nationalism, Lynch shows that these violent stories illuminate significant theological insights that we might miss with a surface reading. Flood and Fury challenges us to let go of the need to rescue the Old Testament from itself and listen afresh to its own critiques on violence.
List(s) this item appears in: Problem of violence
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Holdings
Item type Current library Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book: Standard Hewitson Library, Presbyterian Research Centre Main BS680.V55 L96 2023 (Browse shelf(Opens below)) Available 23-657

Includes bibliographical references and indexes.

Part one: Real problem (with options) -- Facing the problem (without burning down your house) -- Finding our way -- Part two: Shalom and its shattering -- Shalom in creation's DNA -- Violence against women in the Bible's prologue -- Creation's collapse -- Shalom redux -- Part three: Reading Joshua with Yeshua -- Wielding the sword -- Negotiating with the enemy -- Minority report -- Show them no mercy -- Completing the Exodus in Canaan -- Giants will fall -- Worship as warfare -- Part four: Old Testament and the character of God -- What the Old Testament says about God's character -- Irresolvable.

What do we do with a God who sanctions violence? Old Testament violence proves one of the most troubling topics in the Bible. Too often, the explanations for the brutality in Scripture fail to adequately illustrate why God would sanction such horrors on humanity. These unanswered questions leave readers frustrated and confused, leading some to even walk away from their faith. In Flood and Fury, Old Testament scholar Matthew Lynch approaches two of the most violent passages in the Old Testament – the Flood and the Canaanite conquest – and offers a way forward that doesn't require softening or ignoring the most troubling aspects of these stories. While acknowledging the persistent challenge of violence in Scripture, Flood and Fury contends that reading with the grain of the text yields surprising insights into the goodness and the mercy of God. Through his exploration of themes related to violence including misogyny, racism, and nationalism, Lynch shows that these violent stories illuminate significant theological insights that we might miss with a surface reading. Flood and Fury challenges us to let go of the need to rescue the Old Testament from itself and listen afresh to its own critiques on violence.

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