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A matrix of meanings : finding God in pop culture / Craig Detweiler and Barry Taylor.

By: Contributor(s): Material type: TextTextSeries: Engaging culturePublisher: Grand Rapids, Mich. : Baker Academic, [2003]Copyright date: ©2003Description: 1 online resource (351 pages) : illustrationsContent type:
  • text
Media type:
  • computer
Carrier type:
  • online resource
ISBN:
  • 9781493403974
  • 1493403974
Subject(s): Additional physical formats: Print version:: Matrix of meanings.DDC classification:
  • 261 21
LOC classification:
  • BR115.C8 D42 2003eb
Other classification:
  • 11.69
Online resources:
Contents:
Introduction : Postmodernity in the marketplace -- Methodology : a matrix of meanings -- Advertising : the air that we breathe -- Celebrities : ancient and future saints -- Music : Al Green makes us cry -- Movies : look closer -- Television : our constant companion -- Fashion : dressing up the soul -- Sports : board generation -- Art : sharks, pills, and ashtrays.
Action note:
  • digitized 2010 HathiTrust Digital Library committed to preserve
Summary: Ross and Rachel had a baby, Britney and Justin broke up, and Time asked if Bono could save the world. From the glittering tinsel of Hollywood to the advertising slogan you can't get out of your head, we are surrounded by popular culture. In contrast to some traditional Christian responses, which have been to shun aspects of popular culture, Craig Detweiler and Barry Taylor offer an insightful treatise on its value. Rather than offering a theology for pop culture, as some recent commentators have, the authors create a constructive theology out of pop culture. Instead of passing judgment on popular culture the authors analyze its elements and ask "What are they doing?" "What do they represent?" and "What do they say about the world in which we live?" Rather than deciding whether Bono, Britney, and the cast of Friends deserve our admiration, Detweiler and Taylor ask what the phenomena of celebrity idolization means. They do not examine whether Nike's "Just do it" campaign is morally questionable; instead, they ask what its success says about our society.
List(s) this item appears in: E-book Holdings for "Christian Theology and the Arts," Uni of Otago: PAST322/MINS414
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Holdings
Item type Current library Collection Call number Status Notes Date due Barcode
Book: Standard Hewitson Library, Presbyterian Research Centre Chrysalis Seed Collection Available Electronic book

Includes bibliographical references (pages 341-342) and index.

Introduction : Postmodernity in the marketplace -- Methodology : a matrix of meanings -- Advertising : the air that we breathe -- Celebrities : ancient and future saints -- Music : Al Green makes us cry -- Movies : look closer -- Television : our constant companion -- Fashion : dressing up the soul -- Sports : board generation -- Art : sharks, pills, and ashtrays.

Use copy Restrictions unspecified star MiAaHDL

Ross and Rachel had a baby, Britney and Justin broke up, and Time asked if Bono could save the world. From the glittering tinsel of Hollywood to the advertising slogan you can't get out of your head, we are surrounded by popular culture. In contrast to some traditional Christian responses, which have been to shun aspects of popular culture, Craig Detweiler and Barry Taylor offer an insightful treatise on its value. Rather than offering a theology for pop culture, as some recent commentators have, the authors create a constructive theology out of pop culture. Instead of passing judgment on popular culture the authors analyze its elements and ask "What are they doing?" "What do they represent?" and "What do they say about the world in which we live?" Rather than deciding whether Bono, Britney, and the cast of Friends deserve our admiration, Detweiler and Taylor ask what the phenomena of celebrity idolization means. They do not examine whether Nike's "Just do it" campaign is morally questionable; instead, they ask what its success says about our society.

Electronic reproduction. [Place of publication not identified] : HathiTrust Digital Library, 2010. MiAaHDL

Master and use copy. Digital master created according to Benchmark for Faithful Digital Reproductions of Monographs and Serials, Version 1. Digital Library Federation, December 2002. MiAaHDL

http://purl.oclc.org/DLF/benchrepro0212

digitized 2010 HathiTrust Digital Library committed to preserve pda MiAaHDL

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