Anglo-Saxon literary landscapes : ecotheory and the environmental imagination / Heide Estes.

By: Estes, Heide (Heide Ruth) [author.]
Material type: TextTextSeries: Environmental humanities in pre-modern cultures: Publisher: Amsterdam : Amsterdam University Press, [2017]Copyright date: �2017Description: 1 online resource (208 pages)Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9789048528387; 9048528380Other title: Ecotheory and the environmental imaginationSubject(s): Nature in literature | Ecocriticism | Landscapes in literature | Ecology in literature | POETRY / English, Irish, Scottish, Welsh | LITERARY CRITICISM / Medieval | Ecocriticism | Ecology in literature | Landscapes in literature | Nature in literatureGenre/Form: Electronic books.DDC classification: 821.7 LOC classification: PN1065 | .E78 2017ebOnline resources: Click here to access online
Contents:
Introduction -- Imagining the sea in secular and religious poetry -- Ruined landscapes -- Rewriting Guthlac's Wilderness -- Animal natures -- Objects and hyperobjects -- Conclusion: ecologies of the past and the future.
Summary: Literary scholars have traditionally understood landscapes, whether natural or manmade, as metaphors for humanity instead of concrete settings for peoples actions. This book accepts the natural world as such by investigating how Anglo-Saxons interacted with and conceived of their lived environments. Examining Old English poems, such as 'Beowulf' and 'Judith', as well as descriptions of natural events from the 'Anglo-Saxon Chronicle' and other documentary texts, Heide Estes shows that Anglo-Saxon ideologies which view nature as diametrically opposed to humans, and the natural world as designed for human use, have become deeply embedded in our cultural heritage, language, and more.
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Includes bibliographical references and index.

Introduction -- Imagining the sea in secular and religious poetry -- Ruined landscapes -- Rewriting Guthlac's Wilderness -- Animal natures -- Objects and hyperobjects -- Conclusion: ecologies of the past and the future.

Literary scholars have traditionally understood landscapes, whether natural or manmade, as metaphors for humanity instead of concrete settings for peoples actions. This book accepts the natural world as such by investigating how Anglo-Saxons interacted with and conceived of their lived environments. Examining Old English poems, such as 'Beowulf' and 'Judith', as well as descriptions of natural events from the 'Anglo-Saxon Chronicle' and other documentary texts, Heide Estes shows that Anglo-Saxon ideologies which view nature as diametrically opposed to humans, and the natural world as designed for human use, have become deeply embedded in our cultural heritage, language, and more.

Description based on online resource; title from PDF title page (EBSCO, viewed January 11, 2018).

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