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Can a renewal movement be renewed? : questions for the future of ecumenism / Michael Kinnamon.

By: Kinnamon, Michael.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Grand Rapids, Michigan : William B. Eerdmans Publishing Company, 2014Description: viii, 167 pages ; 23 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780802870759; 0802870759.Subject(s): Ecumenical movement -- Miscellanea | Christian union -- MiscellaneaDDC classification: 262.001/1
Contents:
Does ecumenism have a future? -- What would it mean to take the "next step" in ecumenical and interfaith relations -- Is the ecumenical movement a movement for peace? -- What can the churches say together about the church? -- What can the churches say together about the environment? -- Can the tension between unity and justice be overcome? -- Has the ecumenical movement become too "political"? -- What is the way forward for Catholic-Protestant relations? -- How can the Orthodox help others understand them better? -- How are interfaith relationships as challenging as they are necessary? -- How can we deal with the tough issues in Jewish-Christian relations? -- Are councils of churches a thing of the past? -- What does it take to be an ecumenical leader? -- What will it take to revitalize the ecumenical movement? -- Why care about Christian unity when there are so many other things to worry about?
Summary: There is no doubt that ecumenism occupies a prominent place in the history of the church in the twentieth century: countless churches have been renewed through encounter with Christian sisters and brothers in other confessions and cultures. But it is not clear that this ecumenical impulse will continue to figure prominently in the church's story. In this book Michael Kinnamon argues that the ecumenical movement, which has given such energy and direction to the church, needs to be reconceived in a way that provides renewing power for the church in this era; and he shows how this might happen. He names the problems with ecumenism, identifies strengths and accomplishments upon which the church now can build, and suggests practical, concrete steps we can take in the direction of revitalization, especially at the local level.
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book: Standard Hewitson Library, Presbyterian Research Centre
England Collection BX8.3 .K56 2014 (Browse shelf) Available 19-102

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Does ecumenism have a future? -- What would it mean to take the "next step" in ecumenical and interfaith relations -- Is the ecumenical movement a movement for peace? -- What can the churches say together about the church? -- What can the churches say together about the environment? -- Can the tension between unity and justice be overcome? -- Has the ecumenical movement become too "political"? -- What is the way forward for Catholic-Protestant relations? -- How can the Orthodox help others understand them better? -- How are interfaith relationships as challenging as they are necessary? -- How can we deal with the tough issues in Jewish-Christian relations? -- Are councils of churches a thing of the past? -- What does it take to be an ecumenical leader? -- What will it take to revitalize the ecumenical movement? -- Why care about Christian unity when there are so many other things to worry about?

There is no doubt that ecumenism occupies a prominent place in the history of the church in the twentieth century: countless churches have been renewed through encounter with Christian sisters and brothers in other confessions and cultures. But it is not clear that this ecumenical impulse will continue to figure prominently in the church's story. In this book Michael Kinnamon argues that the ecumenical movement, which has given such energy and direction to the church, needs to be reconceived in a way that provides renewing power for the church in this era; and he shows how this might happen. He names the problems with ecumenism, identifies strengths and accomplishments upon which the church now can build, and suggests practical, concrete steps we can take in the direction of revitalization, especially at the local level.

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