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Selling Catholicism : Bishop Sheen and the Power of Television.

By: Lynch, Christopher Owen.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Lexington : The University Press of Kentucky, 2015Description: 1 online resource (216 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780813157092; 0813157099.Subject(s): Sheen, Fulton J. (Fulton John), 1895-1979 | Catholic Church -- United States -- History -- 20th century | Life is worth living (Television program) | Television in religion -- United States -- History | Christianity and culture -- United States -- History -- 20th century | Catholic Church -- United States -- History -- 20th century | Christianity and culture -- United States -- History -- 20th century | Life is worth living (Television program) | Sheen, Fulton J. (Fulton John), 1895-1979 | Television in religion -- United States -- History | RELIGION -- Christian Theology -- GeneralGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Selling Catholicism : Bishop Sheen and the Power of Television.DDC classification: 282.092 | 282/.092 Online resources: Click here to access online
Contents:
Cover; Half-title; Title; Copyright; Contents; Foreword; Preface; Acknowledgments; Introduction; 1 The Shaping of a Medieval Knight for a Modern World; 2 Quest for Stability in the Midst of Change; 3 The Medieval City and the Crusade for the American Ideal; 4 A Television Troubadour Sings His Medieval Lady's Praise; 5 Bishop Sheen's Role Negotiation from Ascetic Bishop to Television Celebrity; 6 Bishop Sheen as Harbinger of an American Camelot; Notes; Bibliography; Index.
Summary: When the popularity of Milton Berle's television show began to slip, Berle quipped, ""At least I'm losing my ratings to God!"" He was referring to the popularity of ""Life Is Worth Living"" and its host, Bishop Fulton J. Sheen. The show aired from 1952 to 1957, and Sheen won an Emmy, beating competition that included Lucille Ball, Jimmy Durante, and Edward R. Murrow. What was the secret to Sheen's on-air success? Christopher Lynch examines how he reached a diverse audience by using television to synthesize traditional American Protestantism with a reassuring vision of Catholicism as patriotic a.
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Cover; Half-title; Title; Copyright; Contents; Foreword; Preface; Acknowledgments; Introduction; 1 The Shaping of a Medieval Knight for a Modern World; 2 Quest for Stability in the Midst of Change; 3 The Medieval City and the Crusade for the American Ideal; 4 A Television Troubadour Sings His Medieval Lady's Praise; 5 Bishop Sheen's Role Negotiation from Ascetic Bishop to Television Celebrity; 6 Bishop Sheen as Harbinger of an American Camelot; Notes; Bibliography; Index.

When the popularity of Milton Berle's television show began to slip, Berle quipped, ""At least I'm losing my ratings to God!"" He was referring to the popularity of ""Life Is Worth Living"" and its host, Bishop Fulton J. Sheen. The show aired from 1952 to 1957, and Sheen won an Emmy, beating competition that included Lucille Ball, Jimmy Durante, and Edward R. Murrow. What was the secret to Sheen's on-air success? Christopher Lynch examines how he reached a diverse audience by using television to synthesize traditional American Protestantism with a reassuring vision of Catholicism as patriotic a.

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