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A greater freedom : biotechnology, love, and human destiny : in dialogue with Hans Jonas and J�urgen Habermas / by Stephan Kampowski ; with a foreword by Stanley Hauerwas.

By: Kampowski, Stephan [author.].
Contributor(s): Hauerwas, Stanley, 1940- [author of foreword.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Cambridge [England] : The Lutterworth Press, 2014Copyright date: �2013Description: 1 online resource (206 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780718841621; 071884162X.Subject(s): Jonas, Hans, 1903-1993 | Habermas, J�urgen | Habermas, J�urgen | Jonas, Hans, 1903-1993 | Liberty | Fate and fatalism | Philosophical anthropology | Biotechnology -- Moral and ethical aspects | PHILOSOPHY -- Free Will & Determinism | RELIGION -- Religion & Science | Philosophical anthropology | Biotechnology -- Moral and ethical aspects | Fate and fatalism | LibertyGenre/Form: Electronic books. | Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Greater freedom : biotechnology, love, and human destiny : in dialogue with Hans Jonas and J�urgen Habermas.DDC classification: 123.5 Online resources: Click here to access online
Contents:
Hans Jonas' philosophy of the organism -- Jonas' philosophy of responsibility -- J�urgen Habermas and genetic enhancement -- Conclusion: a greater freedom.
Summary: How does biotechnology touch on human destiny? What are its promises and challenges? In search for an answer, this book turns to the thought of Hans Jonas, one of the pioneers and founding fathers of bioethics. The continued relevance of his ideas is exemplified by the way J�urgen Habermas applies them to the current debate. The chief promise of biotechnology is to increase our freedom by overcoming the limits of the human condition. The main risk of biotechnology, as both Jonas and Habermas see it, is to diminish or outright abolish our capacity for responsibility and morality. It is argued that the greater freedom is not simply freedom from constraints but freedom for our destiny: the freedom to be the benevolent, responsible, and spontaneous authors of our lives, capable of communion and love. The touchstone for evaluating any biotechnological procedure has to be this greater freedom. -- Provided by publisher.
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Includes bibliographical references.

Hans Jonas' philosophy of the organism -- Jonas' philosophy of responsibility -- J�urgen Habermas and genetic enhancement -- Conclusion: a greater freedom.

How does biotechnology touch on human destiny? What are its promises and challenges? In search for an answer, this book turns to the thought of Hans Jonas, one of the pioneers and founding fathers of bioethics. The continued relevance of his ideas is exemplified by the way J�urgen Habermas applies them to the current debate. The chief promise of biotechnology is to increase our freedom by overcoming the limits of the human condition. The main risk of biotechnology, as both Jonas and Habermas see it, is to diminish or outright abolish our capacity for responsibility and morality. It is argued that the greater freedom is not simply freedom from constraints but freedom for our destiny: the freedom to be the benevolent, responsible, and spontaneous authors of our lives, capable of communion and love. The touchstone for evaluating any biotechnological procedure has to be this greater freedom. -- Provided by publisher.

Online resource; title from PDF title page (ebrary, viewed March 12, 2014).

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