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Servant leadership : a journey into the nature of legitimate power and greatness / essays by Robert K. Greenleaf ; edited by Larry C. Spears ; foreword by Stephen R. Covey ; afterword by Peter M. Senge.

By: Contributor(s): Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : Paulist Press, [2002]Copyright date: ©2002Edition: 25th anniversary edDescription: x, 370 pages ; 23 cmContent type:
  • text
Media type:
  • unmediated
Carrier type:
  • volume
ISBN:
  • 0809105543
  • 9780809105540
Subject(s): DDC classification:
  • 303.3/4 21
LOC classification:
  • HM1261 .G743 2002
NLM classification:
  • HM 1261 G814s 2002
Other classification:
  • QV 584
  • WIR 540f
  • WIR 545f
  • CW 4600
Online resources:
Contents:
The servant as leader -- The institution as servant -- Trustees as servants -- Servant leadership in business -- Servant leadership in education -- Servant leadership in foundations -- Servant leadership in churches -- Servant-leaders -- Servant responsibility in a bureaucratic society -- America and world leadership -- An inward journey -- Postscript.
Summary: With the publication of Servant Leadership in 1977, a new paradigm of management entered the boardrooms and corporate offices of America. Robert K. Greenleaf, a retired AT & T executive, proposed that service ought to be the distinguishing characteristic of leadership. Not only would it create better, stronger companies, he said, but business leaders themselves "would find greater joy in their lives if they raised the servant aspect of their leadership and built more serving institutions." In the quarter century since these ideas were first articulated, the notion of servant leadership has gained ever more disciples in business schools, among executives, in government and in public and private institutions. Greenleaf was among the first to analyze the qualities of leaders and followers--and the necessity for leaders to be attentive to the needs of others. In this respect the leader becomes a follower. Such a leader, said Greenleaf, constantly inquires whether "other people's highest priority needs are being served. Do those served grow as persons? Do they, while being served, become healthier, wiser, freer, more autonomous, more likely themselves to become servants?" The true leader is also a seeker--alert to new possibilities, open, listening and ready for whatever develops. True leadership, then, is an inner quality as much as an exercise of authority. The present volume originated as essays and talks treating servant leadership as a general principle and the way it has been lived by particular people. Sections of the book deal with leadership in education, in foundations, in churches, in bureaucracies, and with the role of the United States as a world leader. It closes with a spiritual reflection on Robert Frost's poem "Directive". The reflection, in Greenland's words, is "partly an acknowledgment of [Frost's] influence on me and partly a sharing with those who are the search for what I have now come to see as servant leadership, and who, sooner or later and in their own way, come to grips with who they are and where they are on the journey."
List(s) this item appears in: Holdings for "Leadership in Communities," KCML - Extra Readings
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Holdings
Item type Current library Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book: Standard Hewitson Library, Presbyterian Research Centre Main HM1261 .G74 2002 (Browse shelf(Opens below)) Available 17-243

Includes index.

The servant as leader -- The institution as servant -- Trustees as servants -- Servant leadership in business -- Servant leadership in education -- Servant leadership in foundations -- Servant leadership in churches -- Servant-leaders -- Servant responsibility in a bureaucratic society -- America and world leadership -- An inward journey -- Postscript.

With the publication of Servant Leadership in 1977, a new paradigm of management entered the boardrooms and corporate offices of America. Robert K. Greenleaf, a retired AT & T executive, proposed that service ought to be the distinguishing characteristic of leadership. Not only would it create better, stronger companies, he said, but business leaders themselves "would find greater joy in their lives if they raised the servant aspect of their leadership and built more serving institutions." In the quarter century since these ideas were first articulated, the notion of servant leadership has gained ever more disciples in business schools, among executives, in government and in public and private institutions. Greenleaf was among the first to analyze the qualities of leaders and followers--and the necessity for leaders to be attentive to the needs of others. In this respect the leader becomes a follower. Such a leader, said Greenleaf, constantly inquires whether "other people's highest priority needs are being served. Do those served grow as persons? Do they, while being served, become healthier, wiser, freer, more autonomous, more likely themselves to become servants?" The true leader is also a seeker--alert to new possibilities, open, listening and ready for whatever develops. True leadership, then, is an inner quality as much as an exercise of authority. The present volume originated as essays and talks treating servant leadership as a general principle and the way it has been lived by particular people. Sections of the book deal with leadership in education, in foundations, in churches, in bureaucracies, and with the role of the United States as a world leader. It closes with a spiritual reflection on Robert Frost's poem "Directive". The reflection, in Greenland's words, is "partly an acknowledgment of [Frost's] influence on me and partly a sharing with those who are the search for what I have now come to see as servant leadership, and who, sooner or later and in their own way, come to grips with who they are and where they are on the journey."

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