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Malay Muslims : the history and challenge of resurgent Islam in Southeast Asia / Robert Day McAmis.

By: McAmis, Robert Day.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Grand Rapids, Mich. : W.B. Eerdmans Pub., ©2002Description: xii, 173 p. : map ; 23 cm.ISBN: 0802849458; 9780802849458.Subject(s): Islam -- Southeast Asia -- History | Muslims -- Malay Archipelago -- History | Malays (Asian people) -- Religion | Islam -- Relations -- Christianity | Christianity and other religions -- IslamDDC classification: 297/.09595/1 Other classification: 11.80 | BE 8100 | LB 46400 | LC 30400 | RR 56962 | BE 8607 | LC 30420
Contents:
Introduction -- A history of Malay Islam -- A history of relations between Islam and the western church in Malay Southeast Asia -- Traditions, beliefs, and practices of Malay Muslims -- Islamic resurgence among Malay Muslims -- The role of the church and Islam in Malay Southeast Asia in the twenty-first century.
Review: "Although Muslims of the Malay race are the largest ethnic community of Muslims in the world, they are little known in the Western hemisphere. Writing as an American Christian missionary who lived among Malay Muslims in the Philippines for over forty years, Robert Day McAmis provides the first comprehensive look at Malay Muslims, describing their history, practices, influence, and distinctive customs. McAmis also gives attention to the history of their relationship with Christians - a history that is key to understanding the current state of religious and social life in places like Indonesia, Malaysia, and the Philippines. Since Muslims and Christians together comprise ninety-four percent of the Malay population, peaceful interaction and cooperation between mosque and church are crucial to realizing the economic and political goals of the entire region." "Considering the so-called "Islamic resurgence" of the last few decades, McAmis pleads for dialogue and mutual understanding. Islam is not monolithic, he says, and Muslims are not the enemies of Christians. Malay Muslims in particular, with their diverse traditions and rich history of international relations, are open to outside influence and exchange. McAmis concludes the "future of Malay Southeast Asia is bright indeed if Muslims and Christians of goodwill work together to solve the problems of this area.""--Jacket.
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book: Standard Hewitson Library, Presbyterian Research Centre
England Collection BP63.A38 M33 2002 (Browse shelf) Available 16-593

Includes bibliographical references (pages 123-164) and index.

Introduction -- A history of Malay Islam -- A history of relations between Islam and the western church in Malay Southeast Asia -- Traditions, beliefs, and practices of Malay Muslims -- Islamic resurgence among Malay Muslims -- The role of the church and Islam in Malay Southeast Asia in the twenty-first century.

"Although Muslims of the Malay race are the largest ethnic community of Muslims in the world, they are little known in the Western hemisphere. Writing as an American Christian missionary who lived among Malay Muslims in the Philippines for over forty years, Robert Day McAmis provides the first comprehensive look at Malay Muslims, describing their history, practices, influence, and distinctive customs. McAmis also gives attention to the history of their relationship with Christians - a history that is key to understanding the current state of religious and social life in places like Indonesia, Malaysia, and the Philippines. Since Muslims and Christians together comprise ninety-four percent of the Malay population, peaceful interaction and cooperation between mosque and church are crucial to realizing the economic and political goals of the entire region." "Considering the so-called "Islamic resurgence" of the last few decades, McAmis pleads for dialogue and mutual understanding. Islam is not monolithic, he says, and Muslims are not the enemies of Christians. Malay Muslims in particular, with their diverse traditions and rich history of international relations, are open to outside influence and exchange. McAmis concludes the "future of Malay Southeast Asia is bright indeed if Muslims and Christians of goodwill work together to solve the problems of this area.""--Jacket.

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